The black dog (WG Sebald)

June 25, 2013 § Leave a comment

We made our way back on foot. For both of us the walk proved too long. Downcast we strode on in the autumn sunshine, side by side. The houses of Kritzendorf seemed to go on forever. Of the people who lived there not a sign was to be seen. They were all having lunch, clattering the cutlery and plates. A dog leapt at a green-painted iron gate, quite beside itself, as if it had taken leave of its senses. It was a large black Newfoundland, its natural gentleness broken by ill-treatment, long confinement or even the crystal clarity of the autumn day. In the villa behind the iron fence nothing stirred. Nobody came to the window, not even a curtain moved. Again and again the animal ran up and hurled itself at the gate, only occasionally pausing to eye us where we stood as if transfixed. As we walked on I could feel the chill of terror in my limbs. Ernst turned to look back once more at the black dog, which had now stopped barking and was standing motionless in the midday sun. Perhaps we should have let it out. It would probably have ambled along beside us, like a good beast, while its evil spirit might have stalked among the people of Kritzendorf in search of another host, and indeed might have entered them all simultaneously, so not one of them would have been able to lift a spoon or fork again.
(WG Sebald, 1990, Vertigo)

The large black Newfoundland. One of the many dogs in WG Sebald’s work.Here the dog is menacing. But not as the dog that rushes the fence (although that seems to be a deeply ingrained fear for many), but as the black dog that figures depression. The narrator in Vertigo visits his friend Ernst, who has lived most of his life in a mental institution. Both are dealing with mental illness and in this episode they literally walk into the terror of it.

In Vertigo, as in Sebald’s other work, the dog mostly is a melancholy omen of actual or potential illness. As someone living with dogs, I find this aspect of Sebald’s work difficult to reconcile with that so much of his work is inspired by dogs. In an often quoted interview Sebald talks about how he has always had dogs and how the dog running in the field, following his nose, has taught him about writing and about walking and finding things.

For me, my dogs bring so much happiness and fun and laughter into my life; I cannot think easily of dogs as harbingers of bad things. But there is, of course, a long tradition in folklore of the dog as bad omen. And particularly the black dog.

There is also a dog in the cover photograph of my Penguin Books 2005 edition of Campo Santo, a collection of Sebald’s writings published after his death. It is a Kertesz photo of the church in Piana, Corsica, 1932. Men clad in black and in hats are lined up sitting outside the church, in the shade. It is probably a Sunday. A yellow, or white, dog shares the shadow of the church with them.

The photo is so Sebaldian in its style that I wonder whether it might have been one of the remembered images at the core of Sebald’s writing process: “[…] and on a walk there a remembered image came into my mind”, he writes somewhere in one of the pieces in Campo Santo. I can’t remember where, but it might have been the title essay, based on Sebald walking in Corsica. André Kertesz, of course, was a poet among photographers, observing the everyday, the easily missed moments. So here a dog as part of everyday life. No matter whether white, or black.

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Statue in Edinburgh Botanical Gardens

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And more

Interview by Joe Cuomo with Sebald talking about dogs and writing

W.G. Sebald and the Writing of History (ed. by Anne Fuchs and J. Jonathan James Long 2007)

Books and other readings

August 7, 2012 § 2 Comments

I always enjoy getting ideas for further readings, so I’ve added a page titled ‘Readings’ to the blog. I’ll fill it up with the books and other readings I come across while learning about dogs; with what I find useful and has influenced my thinking–about dogs specifically, and about our relationship with nature and animals more generally.

I was going to group them (‘dog training’, ‘dog behaviour’, ‘dog nutrition’, &c.), but then I got stuck with the pesky old question of how to categorise things. Things are always connected and can fit into so many categories, and I always struggle with where to stick things in. So I decided to just list them alphabetically and write a short annotation, so that you can pick and choose when browsing.

Happy reading and browsing, and it would be great to hear your thoughts on these and on your other readings.

Not at all about dogs–but about food and more

August 1, 2012 § Leave a comment

I’ve just stumbled across a food blog that my foodie friends would love, I think. And it is so much more than a food blog. It’s like recipes, cook books, literature, art, history … all rolled into one. And in a really good, beautiful way.

It’s called Food Through the Pages, and the post that got me was the one on brewing klava. I so want to try that now, but I’m not sure about making a filter of crushed egg shells. The other recipes also are taken from works of fiction. What an awesome idea.

Food, or certain alcoholic or other drinks, are often so much part of the narrative or characters that it’s maybe not surprising that reading a certain book I suddenly find myself taking something of the book’s culinary world into my everyday life. I still remember reading The Kite Runner, and although never ever having drunk black tea very strong or with sugar, after day 3 of reading the book I just had to make strong black tea with sugar. And then there was that book where I found myself sipping away at an ouzo every evening. (Any ideas which one that was?)

Which books have inspired your cooking, eating and drinking?

One of my favourite places for reading, eating, and drinks.

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